1963 Lancia Flaminia Sport 3C 2.8 by Zagato

Following Lancia’s reorganisation in 1955, the Flaminia line was introduced as the successor to the legendary Aurelia. It entered production in 1957 and not only employed an updated version of the DeVirgilio V-6 and rear-mounted transaxle but also adopted an unequal-length double-wishbone front suspension to replace the sliding pillar front suspension Lancia had used since the 1922 Lambda. These modifications endowed the Flaminia with refinement and poise and served as the basis for a broad model range. In addition to the factory-built berlina, Flaminias also were available as a coupé from Pinin Farina, as the GT and GT Convertible from Touring, and in the form of a more sporting variant from Zagato.

The alloy-bodied Flaminia Sport debuted at the 1958 Turin Auto Show in 2.5-litre, 119-brake horsepower form, and it was one of Zagato’s most successful designs of the era, as it featured the carrozzeria’s classic rakish lines and double-bubble roof. Although production records are less than perfectly reliable, after an initial run of approximately 99 examples with faired-in covered headlights, the design was modified to accommodate the open vertical headlights, as seen here. In 1961, the 2.5-litre engine was updated with three Weber double-downdraft carburettors, increasing brake horsepower to 140, and in 1963, an enlarged triple-carb, 2.8-litre engine saw power increase to 150 brake horsepower. With its lighter weight, better aerodynamics, and longer final drive, the 2.8 3C Sport is a capable long-distance tourer.

Although not intended as an all-out racer, the Flaminia Sport saw some competition success in the hands of privateers, including overall victories at the 1960 and 1963 Coppa Intereuropa, class wins at the 1962 and 1963 Targa Florio, and a 2nd place finish on the 1961 Mille Miglia, an event that was regularly run at the time.

bthinx

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.